Essential Question 12

I think the applications from my project to other teachers’ classrooms is pretty clear. My project has shown that implementing brain gym in my classroom has improved classroom morale, student happiness and classroom environment. Additionally, my results demonstrated a pattern that suggests improved engagement after extended use of brain gym. Teachers who are looking to improve the morale and environment of their classrooms will benefit from using brain gym in their classrooms.  Also, teachers who are looking for long term solutions to engagement issues should consider implementing brain gym as an intervention. 

As for me, I will continue using brain gym and I will continue to monitor its effects on engagement. I am also looking in to other types of brain breaks, and will begin experimenting using other brain breaks besides brain gym. I’m pretty convinced thought that brain breaks and fun, quick and good use of class time!

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7 thoughts on “Essential Question 12

  1. I am so glad your research was successful! I have used “brain breaks” for years, but the activities were not through an official program. When students begin to show signs of losing interest or getting restless, I will have them quickly stand up and stretch to ceiling, stretch to the floor, and wiggle, wiggle, wiggle, or I might have them do ten jumping jacks. I even give kids the option to take “seat breaks” while reading, where they look out the window or a poster in the wall for a few seconds to give their brain a break from reading every few minutes. Students with shorter attention spans seem to benefit the most – as long as they get back on the task of reading. So, after all that, I guess I’m just trying to suggest that programs designed to help with brain breaks, like brain gym, are great, but brain breaks do need to come in the form of an official program.

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  2. I agree that this could be used as a long term intervention. Our school had cross country skiers working with students this week. Instead of a half hour gym time, the students were active for a full hour. It was amazing to see how much more focused the students were when they came back into the classroom. While I hate giving up instructional time, it is worth it when you see how the students are more engaged and happier. How receptive where your administrators to using more class time for brain breaks? I am afraid that some administrators would not be supportive.

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    • I never had a conversation with my principal about the brain breaks, but she came in a few times while we were doing them and joined in! So I’m assuming she approves 🙂 She always encourages us to do anything we can to keep the kids happy.

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  3. I love that your project was so focused. I firmly believe in brain breaks, but now I really want to check out Brain Gym in particular. Do you know, is there just one edition of the book? I had looked at one a long time ago and it seemed like it hadn’t been updated in a long time. Regardless, if it works, it works. I’m just curious. 🙂

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    • There are a few different editions, the one that I found as suggested to be the most helpful is the teacher’s edition of Brain Gym. I have a copy that was printed in 2010, so it isn’t too old!

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  4. hmdavis2013 says:

    I agree that brain breaks could be implemented in almost any classroom. I am glad that all of us who did them saw good results. We all focused on something a bit different, so it is good to be able to put everyone’s results together.

    I am glad that you are looking into other types on brain breaks. I pulled mine from a lot of places. Have you made a list of ones you liked and ones you didn’t? I find that I need to write these things down or I forget until I try it again and realize, “oh yeah, that didn’t work so well last time either.”
    I also like Stephanie’s idea of seat breaks. It is the same concept though. Give them a break and them let them go back to what they were doing refreshed.

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